Historic Quotes: Sunday vs. Sabbath

NOTE: I would recommend reading my article Sabbath vs. Sunday, of which this post is intended to be a constituent of, before proceeding to the quotes below, if you have not done so already.

For easier navigation, below, you may click the links following each headline to jump to that respective section of the quotes below.

Scans or links to digital copies of the original sources will be provided when possible. Also note that some of the quotes which argue in favor of the seventh-day as the true Christian Sabbath do erroneously refer to the first day of the week as the Lord’s day (again, see my original article linked above for more info regarding this matter).

The Primitive Church: Secular/Misc. Sources

Protestant Sources
Catholic Sources

“For although almost all the churches throughout the world celebrate the sacred mysteries [The Lord’s Super] on the Sabbath of every week, yet the Christians of Alexandria and at Rome, on account of some ancient tradition, refuse to this.” “That is, upon the Saturday, it should be observed, that sunday is never called “The Sabbath” by the ancient fathers and historians”-Ecclesiastical History by Socrates, Book 5, Ch. 22, P 289

“from the Apostles’ time until the Council of Laodicea, which was about the year 364, the Holy observation of the Jews’ Sabbath continued, as may be proved out of many authors: yea, notwithstanding the decree of the council against it”-Sunday a Sabbath, by John Ley, p.183

“There is not any city of the Grecians, nor any of the Barbarians, nor any nation whatsoever whither our custom of resting on the Seventh Day hath not come!”-Notes and Queries on China and Japan by M’Clatchie, Vol. 4. Nos. 7, 8, c. 100

“Widespread and enduring was the observance of the seventh-day sabbath among the believers of the church of the east and the St. Thomas Christians of India, who never were connected with Rome. It was also maintained among those bodies which broke off from Rome after the Council of Chalcedon namely, the Abyssinians, the Jacobites, the Maronites, and the Armenians.”-Schaff-Herrog. “The New Encyclopedia of of Religious Knowledge” Art. “Nestorians”; also Realencyclopaedie fur Protestantische and Kirche, art ‘Nestorianer”

“[The Early Russian Christian Church of Muskavee or “Sabbotnicki”] keep Saturday Holy. They have solemn service on Saturdays.”-Pilgrimmes, Part 2, pg. 1269

“Some have suffered torture because they would not rest when others kept sunday, for they declared it to be the holiday and law of Antichrist”-Sebastian Frank (A.D. 1536)

“The gentile Christians observed also the Sabbath and Passover”-Church History, Giesler, Vol. 1, ch. 2, par. 30, p. 93

“The ancient kings on this culminating day closed their gates, the merchants did not travel and the princes did not inspect their domains.”-M’Clatchie, A Translation of the Confucian Classic of Change, page 118

“Then the Spiritual seed of Abraham fled to Pella, on the other side of Jordan, where they found a safe place of refuge and could serve their master and keep his Sabbath.”-Eccesiastical History by Eusebius, b, 3, Chap. 5

“The people of Constantinople, and almost everywhere, assemble together on the Sabbath, as well as on the first day of the week, which custom is never observed at Rome or at Alexandria”-Ecclesiastical History by Socrates, Book 7, Chap. 19

“The hills of Persia and the valleys of the Tigris and Euphrates re-echoed their songs of praise. They reaped their harvests and paid their tithes. They repaired to their churches on the Sabbath Day for the worship of God.-“Realencyclopaedie fur Protestantische and Kirche, art ‘Nestorianer” also Yale ‘The Book of Ser Marco Polo. Vol. 2, p.409

“The Nestorians eat no pork and keep the Sabbath. They believe in neither auricular confession nor purgatory.”-The New Encyclopaedia of Religious Knowledge by Schaff-Herzog, Art. Nestorians

“On the Seventh Day we offer sacrifices, after having purified our hearts, and received absolution for our sins, this religion so perfect and so excellent, is difficult to name, but it enlightens darkness by it’s brilliant precepts”-Christianity in China by M. I’Abbe Huc, Vol. 1, Ch. 2, pg. 48, 49

“The Taipings when asked why they observed the Seventh Day Sabbath, replied that it was, first, because the bible taught it, and, second, because their ancestors observed it as a day of worship.”-A critical History of the Sabbath and Sunday

“Bulgaria in the early season of its evangelization had been taught that no work should be performed on the Sabbath”-Responsa Nicolai Papae I and Consulta Bulgamrum, Responsum 10, found in Mansi, Sacorum Concilorum Nova et Amplissima Collectio, Vol. 15; p. 406; also Hefele, Concinengeschicte, Vol. 4, Sec. 478

The Papal author, Bonacursus, wrote the following against the “Pasagani”: “Not a few, but many know what are the errors of those who are called Pasagini…First, they teach that we should obey the Sabbath, furthermore, to increase their error, they condemn and reject all the church fathers, and the whole Roman Church.”-D’Achery, Spicilegium I, f. 211-214; Muratory, sevi. 5, f. 152, Hahn, 3, 209

“In 1310, two hundred years before Luther’s theses, the Bohemian brethren constituted one-fourth of the population of Bohemia, and that they were in touch with the Waldenses who abounded in Austria, Lombardy, Bohemia, North Germany, Thuringia, Brandenburg, and Moravia. Erasmus pointed out how strictly Bohemian Waldenses kept the Seventh Day Sabbath.”-Armitage, “A history of the Baptists,” p. 313; Cex, The Literature of the Sabbath Questions. Vol. 2, pp. 201-2

“Erasmus testifies that even as late as about 1500 these Bohemians not only kept the Seventh Day scrupulously, but also were called Sabbatarians.”-Cox, “the literature of the Sabbath Question,” Vol. 2 pp. 201, 202; “Truth Triumphant,” p.204

“(Today Czechoslovakia.) Their history from 1635 to 1867 is thus described by Adolf Dux: “the condition of the Sabbatarians was dreadful. Their books and writings had to be delivered to the Karlsburg Consistory to be come the spoil of flames.”-Aus Ungarn, pp. 239-291m Leipzig, 1850

“It seems to have been customary in the celtic churches of early times, in Ireland as well as Scotland, to keep Saturday, The Jewish Sabbath, as a day of rest from labour. They obeyed the Fourth Commandment literally upon the seventh day of the week.”-Professor James C. Moffatt, D.D. Professor of Church History at Princeton, The Church in Scotland, pg. 140

“They held that Saturday was properly the Sabbath on which they abstained from work.”-Celtic Scotland, Vol. 2, Pg. 350

“[St. Columba] Having continued his labours in Scotland thirty-four years, he clearly and opnely foretold his death, and on Saturday, the ninth of June, said to his disciple Diermit: “This day is called the Sabbath, that is, the rest day, and such will it truly be to me; for it will put an end to my labours.”-Butler’s Live’s of the Saints, Vol.1 A.D. 597 art. St. Columba, p. 762

“The Editor of the best biography of Columba says in a footnote: “our Saturday. The Custom to call the Lord’s Day Sabbath did not commence until a  thousand years later.”-Adamman’s Life of Columba, p. 230

“There is much evidence that the Sabbath prevailed in Wales universally until A.D. 1115, when the first Roman Bishop was seated at St. Davids. The old Welsh Sabbath-keeping churches did not even then altogether bow the knee to Rome but fled to their hiding places.”-Seventh day Baptists in Europe and America, Vol. 1, p. 29

“Here in England are about nine or ten churches that keep the Sabbath, besides many scattered disciples, who have been eminently preserved.”-Stennet’s letters, 1668 and 1670, Cox. San, 1, 268

“A Christian keeping the Commandment of God and the faith of Jesus, being baptized about the year 1648, and keeping the Seventh Day for the Sabbath above thirty-two years.”-From the tombstone of Physician to King and Queen of of England Dr. Peter Chamberlain, Telegraph Print, Napier

“And because [the Waldenses] observed no other other day of rest but the Sabbath Dayes, they called them insabathas, as much to say, as they observed no Sabbath.”-Luther’s “Fore-Runners” (original spelling), pp. 7, 8

“It was the practice, generally, of the eastern churches, and some churches of the west… it seems Saturday was held in fair esteem. They came together on the Sabbath day to worship Jesus Christ, the Lord of the Sabbath”-Unknown Source

“Augustine shows here that the Sabbath was observed in his day “in the greater part of the Christian world,” and his testimony in this respect is all the more valuable becuase he himself was an earnest and consistent Sunday-keeper.”-See “Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers,” 1st Series, Vol. 1, pp. 353, 354

“In the last half of that century St. Ambrose of Milan stated officially that the Abyssinian bishop Musesus, had “travelled almost everywhere in the country of the Seres’ (China). For more than seventeen centuries the Abyssinian Church continued to sanctify Saturday as the holy day of the fourth commandment”-Ambrose, De Moribus, Brachmanorium Opera Omnia, 1132, found in Minge, Patrologia Latina, Vol. 17, pp. 1131-1132

“Canon 26 of the Council of Elvira reveals that the church of Spain at that time kept Saturday, the seventh day. “As to fasting every Sabbath: Resolved, that the error be corrected of fasting every Sabbath.” This resolution of the council is in direct opposition to the policy the church at Rome had inaugurated, that of commanding Sabbath as a fast day in order to humiliate it and make it repugnant to the people.”-SPAIN-COuncil Elvira (A.D. 305)

“Mingana proves that as early as A.D. 225 there existed large bishoprics or conferences of the Church of the East stretching from Palestine to, and surrounding, India. In 370 Abyssinian Christianity (a Sabbathkeeping church) was so popular that its famous director, Musaeus, traveled extensively in the East promoting the church in Arabia, Persia, India, and China. In 410 Isaac, supreme director of the Church of the East, held a world council, — stimulated, some think, by the trip of Musaeus, — attended by eastern delegates from forty grand metropolitan divisions. In 411 he appointed a metropolitan director for China. These churches were sanctifying the seventh day, as can be seen by the famous testimonies of Socrates and Sozomen, Roman Catholic historians (c. A.D. 450), that all the churches throughout the world sanctified Saturday except Rome and Alexandria, which two alone exalted Sunday. A century later (c. A.D. 540) Cosmas, the celebrated world traveler, a member of the great Church of the East, testified to the multiplied number of churches of his faith he had seen in India and central Asia and to those he had learned about in Scythia and China. We wrote in previous pages of the Sabbathkeeping Irish, Scottish, Welsh, and English Churches in the British Isles during these same centuries and down to 1200. We dwelt upon the Paulicians, Petrobrusians, Passagians, Waldenses, Insabbatati, as great Sabbathkeeping bodies of Europe down to 1250. We wrote of the sabbatarians in Bohemia, Transylvania, England, and Holland between 1250 and 1600, as authenticated by Cox, Jones, Allix, and William of Neuburg. We have mentioned the innumerable Sabbath-keeping churches among the Greeks, Abyssinians, Armenians, Maronites, Jacobites, Scythians, and the great Church of the East (also from A.D. 1250 to 1600) with supporting evidence from competent authorities. The doctrines of all these Sabbathkeeping bodies throughout the centuries were comparatively pure, and the lives of their members were simple and holy. They were free from the unscriptural ceremonies which arose from the following of tradition. They received the Old Testament, and the whole Bible was their authority.”-Mingana, “Early Spread of Christianity,” Bulletin of John Ryland’s Library, vol. 10, p. 460.

“We command all Christians to observe the Lord’s day to be held not in honour of the past Sabbath, but on account of that holy night of the first day of the week called the Lord’s day. When speaking of that Sabbath which the Jews observe, the last day of the week, and which also our peasants observe…”-Council of Friaul, Italy–A.D. 791 (Canon 13), Mansi, 13, 831

“Pope Gregory I, declared that when anti-Christ should come he would keep Saturday as the Sabbath… “Gregory, bishop by the grace of God to his well-beloved sons, the Roman citizens: It has come to me that certain men of perverse spirit have disseminated among you things depraved and opposed to the holy faith, so that they forbid anything to be done on the day of the Sabbath. What shall I call them expect preachers of anti-Christ?”… Moreover, this same Pope Gregory had issued an official pronouncement against a section of the city of Rome itself because the Christian believers there rested and worshipped on the Sabbath”-Epistles of Gregory I, b. 13. epist. 1, found in “Nicene and East-Nicene Fathers

“Ambrose, the celebrated bishop of Milan, said that when he was in Milan he observed Saturday, but when in Rome observed Sunday. This gave rise to the proverb, ‘when you are in Rome, do as Rome does.'”-Heylyn, The History of the Sabbath, 1612

“Pope Nicholas I, in the ninth century, sent the ruling prince of Bulgaria a long document saying in it that one is to cease from work on Sunday, but not on the Sabbath. The head of the Greek Church, offended at the interference of the Papacy, declared the Pope ex-communicated”-Truth Triumphant, p. 232

Catholic Sources

The Primitive Church: Secular/Misc. Sources
Protestant Sources

”The current notion that Christ and His apostles authoritatively substituted the first day for the seventh, is absolutely without any authority in the New Testament.” -Dr. Layman Abbot, in the Christian Union, June 26, 1890

“It is true that there is no positive command for infant baptism. Nor is there any for keeping holy the first day of the week. Many believe that Christ changed the Sabbath. But, from His own words, we see that He came for no such purpose. Those who believe that Jesus changed the Sabbath base it only on a supposition.” –Amos Binney, Theological Compendium, page 180-181

“To me it seems unaccountable that Jesus, during three years’ discussion with His disciples, often conversing with them upon the Sabbath question, discussing it in some of its various aspects, freeing it from its false (Jewish traditional) glosses, never alluded to any transference of the day; also, that during the forty days of His resurrection life, no such thing was intimated. Nor, so far as we know, did the Spirit, which was given to bring to their remembrance all things whatsoever that He had said unto them, deal with this churches, counseling and instructing those founded, discuss or approach the subject. Of course I quite well know that Sunday did come into use in early Christian history as a religious day, as we learn from the Christian Fathers and other sources. But what a pity that it comes branded with the mark of Paganism, and christened with the name of the sun-God, then adopted and sanctified by the Papal apostasy, and bequeathed as a sacred legacy to Protestantism.” -Dr. E.T. Hiscox, report of his sermon at the Baptist Minister’s convention, in New York Examiner, November 16, 1893.

“When St. Paul repudiated the works of the law, he was not thinking of the Ten Commandments, which are as unchangeable as God Himself is, which God could not change and still remain the infinitely holy God.” –Our Sunday Visitor, Oct. 7, I951

“The arguments…are firmly grounded on the word of God, and having been closely studied with the Bible in hand, leave no escape for the conscientious Protestant except the abandonment of Sunday worship and the return to Saturday, commanded by their teacher, the Bible, or, unwilling to abandon the tradition of the Catholic Church, which enjoins the keeping of Sunday, and which they have accepted in direct opposition to their teacher, the Bible, consistently accept her (the Catholic Church) in all her teachings. Reason and common sense demand the acceptance of one or the other of these alternatives: either Protestantism and the keeping holy of Saturday, or Catholicism and the keeping holy of Sunday. Compromise is impossible.” The Catholic Mirror, (September 23, 1893)

“The [Catholic] Church, on the other hand, after changing the day of rest from the Jewish Sabbath, or seventh day of the week, to the first, made the Third Commandment refer to Sunday as the day to be kept holy as the Lord’s Day”. -The Council of Trent (Sess. VI, can. xix) condemns those who deny that the Ten Commandments are binding on Christians. The Catholic Encyclopedia, Commandments of God, Volume IV, 1908 by Robert Appleton Company, Online Edition 1999 by Kevin Knight, Nihil Obstat – Remy Lafort, Censor Imprimatur – +John M. Farley, Archbishop of New York, page 153.

“Deny the authority of the Church and you have no adequate or reasonable explanation or justification for the substitution of Sunday for Saturday in the Third – Protestant Fourth – Commandment of God… The Church is above the Bible, and this transference of Sabbath observance is proof of that fact.”-Catholic Record, September 1, 1923

Q. Which is the Sabbath day?
A. Saturday is the Sabbath day.
Q. Why do we observe Sunday instead of Saturday?
A. We observe Sunday instead of Saturday because the Catholic Church, in the Council of Laodicea, (AD 364) transferred the solemnity from Saturday to Sunday. [cannon 29]
Q. Why did the Catholic Church substitute Sunday for Saturday?
A. The Church substituted Sunday for Saturday, because Christ rose from the dead on a Sunday, and the Holy Ghost descended upon the Apostles on a Sunday.
Q. By what authority did the Church substitute Sunday for Saturday?
A. The Church substituted Sunday for Saturday by the plenitude of that divine power which Jesus Christ bestowed upon her!-The Converts Catechism, Rev. Peter Geiermann, C.SS.R., (1946), p. 50.

Q: Have you any other way of proving that the [Catholic] Church has power to institute festivals of precept [to command holy days]? A: Had she not such power, she could not have done that in which all modern religionists agree with her: She could not have substituted the observance of Sunday the first day of the week, for the observance of Saturday the seventh day, a change for which there is no Scriptural authority.” -Stephen Keenan, A Doctrinal Catechism, page 174 (this publication may be found public domain @ https://archive.org/details/doctrinalcatechi00keen)

“But since Saturday [7th day], not Sunday is specified in the Bible, isn’t it curious that non-Catholics who profess to take their religion directly form the bible and not from the Church, observe Sunday instead of Saturday? Yes, of course, it is inconsistent; but this change was made about fifteen centuries before Protestantism was born, and by that time the custom was universally observed. They have continued the custom, even though it rests upon the authority of the Catholic Church and not upon an explicit text in the Bible. That observance remains a reminder of the Mother Church from which the non-Catholic sects broke away—like a boy running away from home but still carrying in his pocket a picture of his mother or a lock of her hair.”-John O’Brien, The Faith of Millions (scan available at following link http://pictures.amazingdiscoveries.org/ReferenceIndex/4701-Faith-of-Millions.jpg)

“The Industrial American, published at Harland, Iowa, in its issue of Dec. 19, 1889, contains a notice of a sermon in the Catholic church of that place on Sunday, Dec. 15. After stating that his remarks on Sunday observance created something of a sensation, it presents what was said on that subject, from which we make the following extract. A catholic on such a subject does not speak at random. What he says is the voice of the Catholic Church, and Protestants have to meet it. Will they pay heed to it? He said:— Take, for instance, the day we celebrate—Sunday. What right have the Protestant churches to observe that day?—None whatever. You say it is to obey the commandment, “remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy.” But Sunday is not the Sabbath according to the Bible and the record of time. Every one knows that Sunday is the first day of the week, while Saturday is the seventh day and the Sabbath, the day consecrated as a day of rest. It is so recognized in all civilized nations. I have repeatedly offered $1,000 to anyone who can prove to me from the Bible alone that I am bound to keep Sunday holy. There is no such law in the Bible. It is a law of the holy Catholic Church alone. The Bible says, ‘Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy.’ The Catholic Church says: ‘No. By my divine power I abolish the Sabbath day and command you to keep holy the first day of the week.’ And lo! The entire civilized world bows down in a reverent obedience to the command of the holy Catholic Church.”

-“Father” T. Enright, C.S.S.R. of the Redemptoral College, Kansas City, in a lecture at Hartford, Kansas, February 18, 1884, printed in History of the Sabbath, p. 802
(scan available at following link http://www.sabbathseventhday.org/images/CatholicQuoteJan14-1890.gif)

“The Church changed the observance of the Sabbath to Sunday by right of the divine, infallible authority given to her by her founder, Jesus Christ. The Protestant claiming the Bible to be the only guide of faith, has no warrant for observing Sunday” The Catholic Universe Bulletin, August 14, 1942, page 4

“Sunday is a Catholic institution, and its claims to observance can be defended only on Catholic principles… From beginning to end of Scripture there is not a single passage that warrants the transfer of weekly public worship from the last day of the week to the first”The Catholic Press, Sydney, Australia, August, 1900

“It is well to remind the Presbyterians, Baptists, Methodists, and all other Christians, that the Bible does not support them anywhere in their observance of Sunday. Sunday is an institution of the Roman Catholic Church, and those who observe the day observe a commandment of the Catholic Church.”-Priest Brady, in an address at Elizabeth, New Jersey on March 17, 1903. Reported in the Elizabeth, New Jersey News of March 18, 1903

“Some non-Catholics object to Purgatory because there is no specific mention of it in Scripture. There is no specific mention of the word Sunday in Scripture The Sabbath is mentioned, but Sabbath means Saturday. Yet the Christians of almost all denominations worship on Sunday not on Saturday. The Jews observe Saturday. Nowhere in the Bible is it stated that worship should be changed from Saturday to Sunday.”-Martin J. Scott, Things Catholics are Asked about, 1927, page 236

“All of us believe many things in regard to religion that we do not find in the Bible. For example, nowhere in the Bible do we find that Christ or the Apostles ordered that the Sabbath be changed from Saturday to Sunday. We have the commandment of God given to Moses to keep holy the Sabbath Day, that is the 7th day of the week, Saturday. Today most Christians keep Sunday because it has been revealed to us by the Church outside the Bible.”-The Catholic Virginian, “To Tell You The Truth,” Vol. 22, No. 49 (Oct. 3, 1947)

“… you may read the Bible from Genesis to Revelation, and you will not find a single line authorizing the sanctification of Sunday. The Scriptures enforce the religious observance of Saturday, a day which we never sanctify.” -The Faith of Our Fathers, by James Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop of Baltimore, 88th edition, page 89. Originally published in 1876, republished and Copyright 1980 by TAN Books and Publishers, Inc., pages 72-73.

“in 1562 the Archbishop of Reggio openly declared that tradition now stood above scripture. This is what he wrote. “The authority of the Church is illustrated most clearly by the scriptures, for on one hand she recommends them, declares them to be divine, and offers them to us to be read, and on the other hand, the legal precepts in the scriptures taught by the Lord have ceased by virtue of the same authority. The Sabbath, the most glorious day in the law, has been changed into the Lord’s day. These and other similar matters have not ceased by virtue of (Yahushua) Christ’s teaching (for He says that He has come to fulfill the law, not to destroy it), but they have been changed by the authority of the Church.”
-Gaspare de Posso, Archbishop of Reggio, Council of Trent.

“Christians must not judaize by resting on the Sabbath, but must work on that day, rather honouring the Lord’s Day; and, if they can, resting then as Christians.  But if any shall be found to be judaizers, let them be anathema from Christ” -Council of Laodicea, Canon XXIX, taken from The Seven Ecumenical Councils, by Philip Schaff http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf214.viii.vii.iii.xxxiv.html

“Protestantism, In discarding the authority of the (Roman Catholic) Church, has no good reasons for its Sunday theory, and ought logically to keep Saturday as the Sabbath.” -John Gilmary Shea, American Catholic Quarterly Review, January, 1883.

“Protestants. . .accept Sunday rather than Saturday as the day for public worship after the Catholic Church made the change. . .But the Protestant mind does not seem to realize that . . in observing the Sunday, they are accepting the authority of the spokesman for the church, the Pope.” -Our Sunday Visitor, February 5, 1950

“Not the Creator of the Universe, In Geneses 2:1-3, —but the Catholic Church “can claim the honor of having granted man a pause to his work every seven days.”” -S.D. Moana, Storia della Domenica, 1969, pages 366-367

“If Protestants would follow the Bible, they should worship God on the Sabbath Day. In keeping the Sunday, they are following a law of the Catholic Church.” -Albert Smith, chancellor of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, replying for the Cardinal in a letter, February 10, 1920.

“It was the Catholic Church which, by the authority of Jesus Christ, has transferred this rest (from the Bible Sabbath) to the Sunday. . .Thus the observance of Sunday by the Protestants is an homage they pay, in spite of themselves, to the authority of the (Catholic) Church.” -Monsignor Louis Segur, Plain Talk about the Protestantism of Today, page 225, 1868 https://archive.org/details/plaintalkaboutpr00segu

“We Catholics, then, have precisely the same authority for keeping Sunday holy instead of Saturday as we have for every other article of our creed, namely, the authority of the Church… whereas you who are Protestants have really no authority for it whatever; for there is no authority for it (Sunday sacredness) in the Bible, and you will not allow that there can be authority for it anywhere else. Both you and we do, in fact, follow tradition in this matter; but we follow it, believing it to be a part of God’s word, and the (Catholic) Church to be its divinely appointed guardian and interpreter; you follow it (the Catholic Church), denouncing it all the time as a fallible and treacherous guide, which often ‘makes the commandments of God of none effect’ quoting Matthew 15:6.” -The Brotherhood of St. Paul, The Clifton Tracts, Vol. 4, tract 4, page 15. http://www.amazon.com/Clifton-Tracts-Library-Controversy-Complete/dp/B001VE0JN2 Volumes 1-3 available on archive.org but not volume 4.

“…pastoral intuition suggested to the Church the christianization of the notion of Sunday as “the day of the sun”, which was the Roman name for the day and which is retained in some modern languages.(29) This was in order to draw the faithful away from the seduction of cults which worshipped the sun, and to direct the celebration of the day to Christ, humanity’s true “sun”.” -John Paul II, Dies Domini, 27. The day of Christ-Light, 1998

“The retention of the old pagan name of Dies Solis, for Sunday is, in a great measure, owing to the union of pagan and Christian sentiment with which the first day of the week was recommended by Constantine to his subjects – pagan and Christian alike – as the ‘venerable’ day of the sun.” –Arthur P. Stanley, History of the Eastern Church, p. 184

“Christians in Ethiopia still do today what was common Christian habit back in the 2nd and 3rd centuries — they keep both Saturday and Sunday” -Sabbath in Scripture and History, by Kenneth A. Strand, p.184,1982 http://www.amazon.com/Sabbath-Scripture-History-Kenneth-Strand/dp/0828000379 (more on this subject at http://reluctant-messenger.com/council-of-laodicea.htm)

Socrates wrote in 439 A.D. that “although almost all churches throughout the world celebrate the Sabbath on every week, yet the Christians of Alexandria and at Rome, on account of some ancient tradition (Pagan Sun-Day worship), have ceased to do this.” -Sabbath in Scripture and History, by Kenneth A. Strand, p.147,1982

“The Sabbath was Saturday, not Sunday. The [Catholic] Church altered the observance of the Sabbath to the observance of Sunday. Protestants must be rather puzzled by the keeping of Sunday when God distinctly said, ‘Keep holy the Sabbath Day.’ The word Sunday does not come anywhere in the Bible, so, without knowing it they are obeying the authority of the Catholic Church.” -Canon Cafferata, The Catechism Explained, p. 89

Protestant Sources

The Primitive Church: Secular/Misc. Sources
Catholic Sources

 (Anglican/Episcopal)
“And where are we told in the Scriptures that we are to keep the first day at all? We are commanded to keep the seventh; but we are nowhere commanded to keep the first day …. The reason why we keep the first day of the week holy instead of the seventh is for the same reason that we observe many other things, not because the Bible, but because the church has enjoined it.”Isaac Williams, Plain Sermons on the Catechism , vol. 1, pp.334, 336.

“There is no word, no hint, in the New Testament about abstaining from work on Sunday …. into the rest of Sunday no divine law enters…. The observance of Ash Wednesday or Lent stands exactly on the same footing as the observance of Sunday.”Canon Eyton, The Ten Commandments , pp. 52, 63, 65.

We have made the change from the seventh day to the first day, from Saturday to Sunday, on the authority of the one holy Catholic Church.”Bishop Seymour, Why We Keep Sunday .

(Baptist)
“There was and is a commandment to keep holy the Sabbath day, but that Sabbath day was not Sunday. It will be said, however, and with some show of triumph, that the Sabbath was transferred from the seventh to the first day of the week …. Where can the record of such a transaction be found? Not in the New Testament absolutely not…To me it seems unaccountable that Jesus, during three years’ intercourse with His disciples, often conversing with them upon the Sabbath question . . . never alluded to any transference of the day; also, that during forty days of His resurrection life, no such thing was intimated…Of course, I quite well know that Sunday did come into use in early Christian history . . . . But what a pity it comes branded with the mark of paganism, and christened with the name of the sun god, adopted and sanctioned by the papal apostasy, and bequeathed as a sacred legacy to Protestantism!”-Dr. Edward T. Hiscox, a paper read before a New York ministers’ conference, Nov. 13, 1893, reported in New York Examiner, Nov.16, 1893.

“There was never any formal or authoritative change from the Jewish seventh-day Sabbath to the Christian first-day observance.”-William Owen Carver, The Lord’s Day in Our Day , p. 49.

(Congregationalist)
” . . . it is quite clear that however rigidly or devotedly we may spend Sunday, we are not keeping the Sabbath – . . ‘Me Sabbath was founded on a specific Divine command. We can plead no such command for the obligation to observe Sunday …. There is not a single sentence in the New Testament to suggest that we incur any penalty by violating the supposed sanctity of Sunday.”– Dr. R. W. Dale, The Ten Commandments (New York: Eaton &Mains), p. 127-129.

” . . . the Christian Sabbath [Sunday] is not in the Scriptures, and was not by the primitive Church called the Sabbath.”-Timothy Dwight, Theology: Explained and Defended (1823), Ser. 107, vol. 3, p. 258.

(Disciples of Christ)
“‘But,’ say some, ‘it was changed from the seventh to the first day.’ Where? when? and by whom? No man can tell. No; it never was changed, nor could it be, unless creation was to be gone through again: for the reason assigned must be changed before the observance, or respect to the reason, can be changed! It is all old wives’ fables to talk of the change of the Sabbath from the seventh to the first day. If it be changed, it was that august personage changed it who changes times and laws ex officio – I think his name is Doctor Antichrist.’-Alexander Campbell, The Christian Baptist, Feb. 2, 1824,vol. 1. no. 7, p. 164.

“The first day of the week is commonly called the Sabbath. This is a mistake. The Sabbath of the Bible was the day just preceding the first day of the week. The first day of the week is never called the Sabbath anywhere in the entire Scriptures. It is also an error to talk about the change of the Sabbath from Saturday to Sunday. There is not in any place in the Bible any intimation of such a change.”-First Day Observance , pp. 17, 19.

(Lutheran)
“We have seen how gradually the impression of the Jewish sabbath faded from the mind of the Christian Church, and how completely the newer thought underlying the observance of the first day took possession of the church. We have seen that the Christians of the first three centuries never confused one with the other, but for a time celebrated both.”-The Sunday Problem , a study book of the United Lutheran Church (1923), p. 36.

“They [Roman Catholics] refer to the Sabbath Day, a shaving been changed into the Lord’s Day, contrary to the Decalogue, as it seems. Neither is there any example whereof they make more than concerning the changing of the Sabbath Day. Great, say they, is the power of the Church, since it has dispensed with one of the Ten Commandments!”-Augsburg Confession of Faith art. 28; written by Melanchthon, approved by Martin Luther, 1530; as published in The Book of Concord of the Evangelical Lutheran Church Henry Jacobs, ed. (1 91 1), p. 63.

“The festival of Sunday, like all other festivals, was always only a human ordinance, and it was far from the intentions of the apostles to establish a Divine command in this respect, far from them, and from the early apostolic Church, to transfer the laws of the Sabbath to Sunday.”-Dr. Augustus Neander, The History of the Christian Religion and Church Henry John Rose, tr. (1843), p. 186.

“But they err in teaching that Sunday has taken the place of the Old Testament Sabbath and therefore must be kept as the seventh day had to be kept by the children of Israel …. These churches err in their teaching, for Scripture has in no way ordained the first day of the week in place of the Sabbath. There is simply no law in the New Testament to that effect.”-John Theodore Mueller, Sabbath or Sunday , pp. 15, 16.

(Methodist)
“Take the matter of Sunday. There are indications in the New Testament as to how the church came to keep the first day of the week as its day of worship, but there is no passage telling Christians to keep that day, or to transfer the Jewish Sabbath to that day.”-Harris Franklin Rall, Christian Advocate, July 2, 1942, p.26.

“But, the moral law contained in the ten commandments, and enforced by the prophets, he [Christ] did not take away. It was not the design of his coming to revoke any part of this. This is a law which never can be broken …. Every part of this law must remain in force upon all mankind, and in all ages; as not depending either on time or place, or any other circumstances liable to change, but on the nature of God and the nature of man, and their unchangeable relation to each other.”-John Wesley, The Works of the Rev. John Wesley, A.M., John Emory, ed. (New York: Eaton & Mains), Sermon 25,vol. 1, p. 221.

“The Sabbath was binding in Eden, and it has been in force ever since. This fourth commandment begins with the word ‘remember,’ showing that the Sabbath already existed when God Wrote the law on the tables of stone at Sinai. How can men claim that this one commandment has been done away with when they will admit that the other nine are still binding?”-Dwight L. Moody, Weighed and Wanting (Fleming H. Revell Co.: New York), pp. 47, 48.

(Presbyterian)
“The Sabbath is a part of the decalogue – the Ten Commandments. This alone forever settles the question as to the perpetuity of the institution . . . . Until, therefore, it can be shown that the whole moral law has been repealed, the Sabbath will stand . . . . The teaching of Christ confirms the perpetuity of the Sabbath.”-T. C. Blake, D.D., Theology Condensed, pp.474, 475.

Source: http://www.biblesabbath.org/confessions.html

 

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